Tag Archives: medical school

Pain Specialists and Their Lack of Training

I recently came to the realization, through the help of some well-informed friends, that there is no governing body in the world of medicine that officially endorses so-called Pain Specialists. Anyone can add that misnomer to their credentials after the most basic of training in the non-existent specialty. Since there is no American Board of Pain Management to oversee training and licensing, patients are left to the mercy of the individual doctor’s educational pursuits. There is no easy way for patients to evaluate the experience or training their doctors have received. There are no standards for pain management that patients can rely on during their appointments. If you have every been in pain, especially chronic pain, this is a very real and scary situation.

Only three specialty boards have a sub-specialty in Pain Management –  Anesthesiology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Psychiatry and Neurology. They all use the same certification material and test that was developed by the American Board of Anesthesiology dated 2010. However, it is safe to assume that they approach pain management from their own specialty’s perspective. Anesthesiologists will be the first to recommend epidurals while psychiatrist will recommend therapy or antidepressants, and specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation will recommend exercises and hot/cold therapy. A lot of good research has been done on the different types of pain, pain management therapies, and specific pain-related diseases and disorders in the past four years. I find it disheartening that the educational material might not be keeping up with the progress being made. Also, what exactly are the other doctors learning about pain and pain management? The single chapter in their med school textbook? Every doctor will need to treat patients in pain. I can guarantee that. Pain management should be a required course for all medical students. They should also be required to do a rotation in a reputable pain clinic before graduating.

Now let us discuss pain clinics. They are not regulated. They are not required to have a licensed medical doctor on the premises. I have seen some where a nurse practitioner runs it. There is a growing trend among chiropractors to jump on the pain management bandwagon and call their practices pain clinics too. All too often, pain clinics focus on one single, solitary treatment for a patient’s pain – regardless of the causes. In my eyes, the designation of pain clinic should only apply to a practice that actually takes a multidisciplinary approach to pain management. That means they have a staff who specialize in a variety of pain management approaches – this can include massage therapy, spinal injections, different exercise options, stress management, medication management, trigger point injections, acupuncture, chiropractic manipulation. Pain is too common a condition for our healthcare system to ignore in this way.